and how we can or cannot become smart. This has clearly influenced current educational practices. It is still common educational practice to use the score from standardized intelligence tests to qualify children for various special programs. It is understood these tests measure intelligence precisely and meaningfully. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Supporting the new paradigm of intelligence 天津酒店发生火灾 江西撞人案被枪决

Current research by nursery teacher training course on the brain, learning and human intelligence from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, cognitive sciences, and education has provided information with reflective implications to education. This research is challenging and stretches the customary approaches to education and teaching, mainly with regard to the ability to learn, human intelligence, and how well-organized learning occurs. IntelligenceWhat Is It? The traditional theory of intelligence has two fundamental assumptions: 1. That human cognition is unitary; and 2. That individuals can be sufficiently described as having a single, quantifiable intelligence. The traditional theory of intelligence has helped create a mindset or examples as to what "smart" or "intelligent" is, who has potential or capability to be smart, and how we can or cannot become smart. This has clearly influenced current educational practices. It is still common educational practice to use the score from standardized intelligence tests to qualify children for various special programs. It is understood these tests measure intelligence precisely and meaningfully. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Supporting the new paradigm of intelligence, Howard Gardner of Project Zero at Harvard University has determined that intelligence is a pluralistic fact, rather than a static structure with a single type of intelligence. Gardner defines intelligence as: The ability to make something or offer a service that is valued within one’s culture. In his cross-cultural study of the ways in which people are intelligent, he has identified seven distinct types of intelligences: oVerbal/Linguistic oLogical/Mathematical oMusical oVisual/Spatial oBody/Kinesthetic oInterpersonal oIntrapersonal 1)Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence People with high verbal/linguistic intelligence love words. They prefer to process information through words and language in opposition to pictures. They may prefer oral or written methods, or excel in both. 2)Logical/Mathematical Intelligence People with high logical/mathematical intelligence create order out of confusion by analyzing, grouping, and categorizing. They identify relationships, connections, and patterns more easily than people with less logical intelligence. 3)Musical Intelligence People with high musical intelligence learn best through sound, rhythm, and music. These people learn better when music is playing and through musical images. 4)Visual/Spatial Intelligence People with high visual intelligence process information best using pictures, visuals, and metaphors. They have a sense of direction and a skill to think and plan in three dimensions. 5)Body/Kinesthetic Intelligence People with high kinesthetic intelligence process information through their bodies-through muscle, sensation, and movement. Their bodies are their avenue to learning and understanding any content or subject and are also their chosen form of self-expression. 6)Interpersonal Intelligence People with high interpersonal intelligence process information through relatedness to others. They are "people" people. It is in connection to and with other people that they best understand themselves and the world. 7)Intrapersonal Intelligence People with high intrapersonal intelligence have a strong sense of themselves, their wants, and needs. They are self reflective and in touch with themselves. They may be the rebellious individuals who march to their own drummer. Environmental Strategies by Early Childhood Education to Support Multiple Intelligences. Group activities often favor a teacher’s strengths while meeting the strengths of only a few of the children. Learning stations are momentary activity locations where materials are put out and later put away, generally by an adult. Learning centers are permanent locations, visually and spatially defined areas, ideally three-sided, where materials are organized by subject and available for kids to select independently. Conclusion Through environments that offer a variety of motivating, hands-on materials that children individually select, and by creating learning centers that provide natural opportunities to move, be active, and fully occupied in either solo or small group experiences, we better serve and meet the needs of more children. 相关的主题文章: