How To Speed Up Inter. Surfing With Responsive Dns Servers-face gossip

So, you just clicked "Submit Order" and now your web page is timing out. You can hit Refresh and risk a double charge, try clicking the Back button, or just let it be and call Customer Support. Wouldn’t it be be much better if you could’ve avoided the issue in the first place? It’s true. There are various ways to speed up your internet connection, but did you know that you can browse the Web faster just by using a more responsive Domain Name System (DNS) server? DNS response time surely does contribute to slow-loading web pages, but you can counter this by learning #keyword# browsing with better DNS servers. DNS is actually a service that changes domain names into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, which eases the job of a Web surfer. Therefore, for the convenience of the Web surfer, he/she will usually enter the domain name in the web browser’s address bar instead of the actual IP address. The role of the actual DNS server is to translate the domain name into a pre-configured IP address and send it back to the user’s browser, which is of course, transparent to the user. There are a number of ISP’s which have inefficient DNS servers, which can be detrimental to the speed at which your web pages load. So, to give you with a permanent and valuable solution, I will reveal some of the free alternative DNS servers that you can utilise with any web browser. I’ll also discuss how you can utilize them effectively. Setting your PC to utilize alternate servers instead of your Internet provider’s is a simple change, which works easily in Vista, XP, and Windows 7 operating systems. Here, though, I’ll only be showing how to change this in XP and Vista. XP Users 1.Begin by opening Network Connections: a.Click Start, then Run b.Type ncpa.cpl c.Click on the OK button 2.Right-click on the connection that you normally use to establish an Internet connection 3.Select Properties 4.Click on/highlight Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) 5.Click on Properties 6.Tick the option "Use the following DNS server addresses:" 7.In the Preferred and Alternate DNS server boxes, fill in any of the following suggested servers: OpenDNS Preferred DNS server: 208.67.222.222 Alternate DNS server: 208.67.220.220 Google Public DNS Preferred DNS server: 8.8.8.8 Alternate DNS server: 8.8.4.4 Verizon/GTEI Preferred DNS server: 208.67.222.222 Alternate DNS server: 208.67.220.220 8.Click on the OK button 9.Click the Close button at the bottom of the Properties window. Windows Vista 1.Click Start, then Control Panel 2.In Network and Internet, click on "View network status and tasks" 3.Then, view your Local Area Network status by clicking on the View Status link next to it 4.Click Properties 5.Click Continue in the User Access Control pop-up window 6.In the Local Area Connection Properties window, click on Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/UPv4) 7.Click on Properties 8.In the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) Properties window, tick Use the following DNS server addresses: 9.Fill the Preferred DNS server and Alternate DNS server with any of the following suggested servers: OpenDNS Preferred DNS server: 208.67.222.222 Alternate DNS server: 208.67.220.220 Google Public DNS Preferred DNS server: 8.8.8.8 Alternate DNS server: 8.8.4.4 Verizon/GTEI Preferred DNS server: 208.67.222.222 Alternate DNS server: 208.67.220.220 10.Click OK 11.Click the Close button. I’m certain you’re already aware that remembering a domain name, such as .google.., is a lot easier than attempting to recall a lot of numbers in a strange format, like xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx, where each x is a digit. Could you think how much of a pain it would be to manage and arrange your browser’s bookmarks without the use of DNS? Luckily, it is there to help us and make things more fun, but along with convenience .es a bit of processing delay, which of course, varies by ISP. However, by following the steps above, you should be familiar with #keyword# browsing successfully by picking and implementing the IPs of more responsive DNS servers. 相关的主题文章: